Monday, July 14, 2008

Jennifer Lee, 1956


Jennifer Lee makes these wonderfully quiet but strong hand-built vessels. She incorporates oxides and sands into the body to give the colors and textures. The oxides, which she gets from all over the world can be coarse or fine, each giving it's own texture and feel. Occasionally the interaction of two ajoining oxides will create a halo effect.

The base is pinched to about 1/3 of the height and the rest is built up in tall bands.

Some of her signatures are the asymetrical 'ledge' like rim on the top pot and, lately, a diagonal band of inlayed colored clay.

You can find images of her work on-line, she's represented by the Galerie Besson http://www.galeriebesson.co.uk/ in London and the Frank Lloyd Gallery http://www.franklloyd.com/ in the US.

There is also a very informative YouTube video of her talking about her pots at last year's SOFA exhibition in the states at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLBwi4IfCbE

I would love to have one of her pots but, starting at $3000 they're way out of my price range. She says she only makes about 18 pots a year which I suppose helps keep the value up.

Still, I can dream.

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3 comments:

Craig Edwards said...

Hello Russell: Thank you for the great blog entry on Jennifer Lee. I had never heard of her before.

Russel Fouts said...

Hi Craig,

That's one of the reasons I thought I would do the blog.

I had a look at your's the other night. Nice work. I liked Hank's teabowl as well. I know him from Clayart. He does great work too. BTW, he had this great shino plate he was carrying with him everywhere, he said it had a lot to teach him. It was fantastic, lively crawly shino, just the kind I like. I tried to get it off him but no luck. ;-)

Jon Townley said...

Russell, thank you for posting about Jennifer Lee. I first discovered her two years ago when I purchased Jane Perryman's book "Naked Clay'" which is loaded with great work. Do you know where I can find more information about her prices and buying her work? The galleries don't seem to list such info.